jtotheizzoe:

Klimt’s Scientific Influence
While I was reading about the influence of golden-age Vienna on modern medicine and painters like Gustav Klimt, I discovered that Klimt’s trademark patterns (the “blobs” and orbs you see above, from Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I) were influenced by early studies of cells under the microscope. 
Carl von Rokitansky founded the Second Vienna School of Medicine and eventually befriended Klimt. Rokitansky was a huge influence in the early days of modern science-based medicine, and allowed Klimt to view some of the tissue and bacterial slides from the medical school. It’s a fascinating story, check out more in this interview between Eric Kandel and Jonah Lehrer.
We can talk at length about the similarities of science and art, but this is one of the finest examples of where each feeds from the other. To quote Eric Kandel again, in a note to paste on your wall:

“…[artists] have insight into the human mind that often precedes the insight that scientists have, because scientists need to design experiments, and then carry them out in order to do it. They cannot do it by intuition, alone, as can writers and painters.”

jtotheizzoe:

Klimt’s Scientific Influence

While I was reading about the influence of golden-age Vienna on modern medicine and painters like Gustav Klimt, I discovered that Klimt’s trademark patterns (the “blobs” and orbs you see above, from Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I) were influenced by early studies of cells under the microscope. 

Carl von Rokitansky founded the Second Vienna School of Medicine and eventually befriended Klimt. Rokitansky was a huge influence in the early days of modern science-based medicine, and allowed Klimt to view some of the tissue and bacterial slides from the medical school. It’s a fascinating story, check out more in this interview between Eric Kandel and Jonah Lehrer.

We can talk at length about the similarities of science and art, but this is one of the finest examples of where each feeds from the other. To quote Eric Kandel again, in a note to paste on your wall:

“…[artists] have insight into the human mind that often precedes the insight that scientists have, because scientists need to design experiments, and then carry them out in order to do it. They cannot do it by intuition, alone, as can writers and painters.”

The Peten is pretty awesome, I’ve worked there for several summers.  And once again, this was written by my spouse.

The Peten is pretty awesome, I’ve worked there for several summers.  And once again, this was written by my spouse.

Once again, my husband wrote this.

Once again, my husband wrote this.

jtotheizzoe:

Where the colors of fireworks come from
Happy 4th of July, American friends! Here’s a little chemistry lesson on where the colors in fireworks come from.
Is that not enough for your sponge of a brain? Then here’s a more detailed video on explosive chemistry from Byte Size Science!
(↬ Boing Boing)

jtotheizzoe:

Where the colors of fireworks come from

Happy 4th of July, American friends! Here’s a little chemistry lesson on where the colors in fireworks come from.

Is that not enough for your sponge of a brain? Then here’s a more detailed video on explosive chemistry from Byte Size Science!

( Boing Boing)

(Source: gifmovie)

Small-scale apartment improvements with Willa and Davenport.

I can’t get over how amazing the new Hall of Paleontology is at the Houston Museum of Natural Science.  The exhibit starts with the first evidence of life on Earth, including a huge collection of trilobites, and continues all the way to the Upper Paleolithic.  Overall, the hall was breathtaking (although I wasn’t thrilled with their phylogenetic tree of hominin evolution).  Here are just a few of the awesome fossils they have on display.

staceythinx:

The Fibonacci Sequence As Seen in Flowers gallery by Environmental Graffiti is a math and history lesson wrapped in a pretty package of flowers.

Nature is cooler than you by a whole lot.

fortnightjournal:

“Think of Harrison Ford spot-translating an Inca  inscription by “running it through the Maya”  in the fourth Indiana Jones installment.  Or how, in Aliens vs. Predator, a panel containing a mixture of Aztec, Egyptian, and Cambodian hieroglyphs recounts a gruesome version of the “aliens started human civilization” trope that’s been kicking around since the 1960s.   Actual decipherment is not as straightforward as such films make it out to be. The excitement of epigraphy—the study of ancient inscriptions—is more like that of detective work. Writing systems are like ciphers that have to be broken…”
Meet archaeologist NICHOLAS CARTER and read more of his essay “READING TEXTS” on Fortnight Journal

My husband wrote this.

fortnightjournal:

“Think of Harrison Ford spot-translating an Inca  inscription by “running it through the Maya”  in the fourth Indiana Jones installment.  Or how, in Aliens vs. Predator, a panel containing a mixture of Aztec, Egyptian, and Cambodian hieroglyphs recounts a gruesome version of the “aliens started human civilization” trope that’s been kicking around since the 1960s. 

Actual decipherment is not as straightforward as such films make it out to be. The excitement of epigraphy—the study of ancient inscriptions—is more like that of detective work. Writing systems are like ciphers that have to be broken…”

Meet archaeologist NICHOLAS CARTER and read more of his essay “READING TEXTS” on Fortnight Journal

My husband wrote this.